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Did you stuff yourself silly on Thanksgiving and enjoy an extra piece of pie? It’s OK to indulge a little on the holidays. But now you’re wearing those second helpings on your hips with a belly that’s starting to look a lot like Santa’s, and there are still plenty of parties ahead.
According to the Calorie Control Council, Americans consume up to 4,500 calories in one sitting with a typical Thanksgiving meal. The council’s exercise converter shows that it would take 15 hours of skiing to burn off those calories that are the equivalent of seven Big Macs!

Finding the balance between holiday merrymaking and healthy eating is challenging for most people at this time of year. Slipping in a few good habits in between those yummy egg-nogs will help you avoid any major holiday weight gain without feeling totally deprived.

One study in the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise shows that 45 minutes of early morning exercise helps reduce food cravings and keeps your metabolism fired up all day.

Obesity experts also claim that starving yourself all day before the holiday bash won’t reduce the calories. Arriving hungry usually results in sugar binges, which can lower your immune system. Eating balanced meals in between the festivities will help prevent common seasonal illnesses like colds and flus while helping you stay trim.

Here are some more ways you can have your holiday cake and eat it too without packing on the pounds:

• Eat before the feast: arrive half full so you don’t overload on the junk
• Use smaller plates: studies prove this reduces food intake
• Follow the 3-bite rule: enjoy a taste or two of that dessert but don’t eat the whole thing
• Day on, day off: if you overloaded yesterday, take a day off and eat healthy food tomorrow
• Balance your hormones: testosterone supports carbohydrate metabolism and builds muscle

The Calorie Control Council offers many tips and resources for preventing holiday weight gain, plus makeover recipes for common holiday foods at http://www.caloriecontrol.org/. For more information on hormonal balance and weight issues, visit https://www.sottopelletherapy.com/category/weight-loss/.

How do you celebrate the holidays and avoid extra weight? Post your tips on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/hormonereplacement. “Season’s eatings!”

SOURCES
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19092692
http://www.caloriecontrol.org/articles-and-video/feature-articles/stuff-the-bird-not-yourself
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120912161554.htm – Brigham Young University. “Exercise may affect food motivation.” ScienceDaily 12 September 2012

holiday weight gain